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How to Diagnosis Aphasia

Type of Aphasia

Fluent

Comprehends

Repeats

Global Aphasia

No

No

No

Mixed Transcortical Aphasia

No

No

Yes

Broca's Aphasia

No

Yes

No

Transcortical Motor Aphasia

No

Yes

Yes

Wernicke's Aphasia

Yes

No

No

Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

Yes

Yes

Yes

Conduction Aphasia

Yes

Yes

No

Anomic Aphasia

Yes

Yes

Yes

Type of Aphasia

Fluency

Comprehension

Repetition

Region (Left)

Global Aphasia

Impaired

Impaired

Impaired

Left hemisphere

Mixed Transcortical Aphasia

Impaired

Impaired

Intact

Surrounding Broca’s area

Broca’s Aphasia

Impaired

Intact

Impaired

Inferior frontal

Transcortical Motor Aphasia

Impaired

Intact

Intact

Anterior to Broca’s area

Wernicke’s Aphasia

Preserved

Impaired

Impaired

Superior temporal

Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

Preserved

Impaired

Intact

Surrounding Wernicke’s area

Conduction Aphasia

Preserved

Intact

Impaired

Supramarginal gyrus or insular

Anomic Aphasia

Preserved

Preserved

Preserved

Impaired naming

Language Function in Neurological Assessment:

  • Fluency: This refers to the flow of speech. A fluent speech pattern is smooth, with a normal rate and rhythm. In neurological exams, fluency is observed to see if the patient can produce speech effortlessly and appropriately. Issues with fluency can arise from conditions like aphasia, particularly non-fluent aphasia, where speech production is labored and words are not easily articulated.

  • Comprehension: This is the ability to understand language, both spoken and written. During an exam, a patient may be asked to follow commands, answer questions, or interpret information. Problems with comprehension may occur in conditions like Wernicke's aphasia, where a patient might speak fluently but without making sense and have trouble understanding others.

  • Repetition: The ability to repeat words or sentences is another aspect of language function. It is a complex task that requires both comprehension and speech production abilities. In a neurological exam, the patient might be asked to repeat a phrase to assess this function. Difficulty in repeating phrases can be seen in conduction aphasia, where the connection between speech comprehension and speech production centers in the brain is disrupted.


Global Aphasia

Mixed Transcortical Aphasia (MTA)

Broca's Aphasia

Transcortical Motor Aphasia (TMA)

Wernicke's Aphasia

Transcortical Sensory Aphasia (TSA)

Conduction Aphasia

Anomic Aphasia

Does it have a gold standard for diagnosis?


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